What To Do When Negotiating A Midweek Shared Custody Schedule

Shared-Custody

When a couple decides to get divorced and children are involved, it can be difficult for the two parties to come to an agreement without involving a third party. Due to the complicated nature of shared child custody, such decisions are often decided in court. The court always makes its decision with the best interests of the child in mind, but what is best for the child is not always clear.

In the case of M.C. v P.C., for example, the judge needed to determine whether the parents shared custody agreement was interfering with their children’s homework assignments. One spouse argued that the children were prepared for school from Monday to Thursday while in her custody, but they often showed up unprepared on Fridays under their father’s supervision. The primary parent argued that she had to rush to complete homework assignments Friday morning because the noncustodial parent consistently failed to complete them the prior night. The court agreed that the children’s education is one of the most important aspects of a young child’s life and that both parents needed to take appropriate measures to complete homework assignments, prepare for tests and otherwise prioritize schoolwork. The court emphasized that shared parenting means that both parents meet responsibilities during that time. If a parent wants to share parenting time midweek, overnight and during the school year, then they automatically assume the educational responsibilities during that time.

The attorneys at Nitti & Nitti understand how overwhelming it can be to deal with the challenges of child custody arrangements. With over 30 years of experience, our experts have represented both mothers and fathers in a wide variety of custody disputes. Our main goal is to help parents facilitate what is best for their children. To learn more about how our team of legal advocates can help you, contact our office at 973-226-4141.

The articles on this blog are for informative purposes only and are no substitute for legal advice or an attorney/client relationship. If you are seeking legal advice, please contact our law firm directly.